The meaning of travel 

Why travel? This is the question I always find myself asking when on one of my self-exploration quests. In these moods it is apparent that I tend to ransack my own life, thread-by-thread, until I can find that single piece of hope; the answer to that one key question: why? Maybe it is because of this feeling that never goes away; the constant need to search, high-and-low, country to country, for the ‘something’ that I feel I need to grab a hold of. This ‘something’ is, I can only describe as, the true essence of life, the meaning of our existence, or quite simply put; myself.

I have always assumed I was a travel lover as it was a means of searching for myself. Through extensive travelling externally, you coincidentally explore internally, and discover more about who you are. Constantly searching to find the place, the people, to where you feel you belong. But as time passes, as it does, I am still in the thick of my exploration and very much still suffering the full feverish symptoms of this travelling ‘bug’ I have always been told I had and yet without any further developments as to this ‘real me’ I have been awaiting to discover. And so I am starting to question the reasons behind my lifestyle choices once again.

It has occurred to me this time, however, that the answer to this question has shifted, and this time it is far less evocative and meditative as my previous answer. This time, I am starting to think that the reason why I travel is a lot more simple, a lot more straight forward, and along much more of a ‘just because’ line of thought. Why travel? To explore the world and its greatness, to grab hold of life, and to spend every second sucking in the earth’s beauty like oxygen. And why? Well, to do the annoying answering a question with a question. Just because: why not?

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Summer 2015 Book List.

I am constantly scrawling down ‘books to read’ lists everywhere. I like to read a few books at the same time, and always a good variety of genres. Here is my summer  ‘Reading List’ for your eyes only. Plenty of time for you to finish the book that you are on now and nip down to Waterstones to make your next purchase.

So, please have a read of my list and maybe scrawl a few onto your book list too. Enjoy!

How To Be Parisian: Wherever You Are by Anne Berest, Caroline de Maigret, Sophie Mas, Audrey Diwan

Because we all secretly want to be French, and we want their secrets now! Parisian life, love and liberty wedged inside a cover that will look divine on your coffee table. And don’t just stop at the book, become as obsessed as I have and follow the Instagram page which is just as dreamy.

How To Be Parisian: Wherever You Are

How To Be Parisian: Wherever You Are

The Book Of Lost Things by John Connolly

This book was published in 2006, and only now am I turning its pages… my book lists really do go on that long. I am so glad that it is having its turn as I am completely and utterly absorbed by this book. My commute is so much better, my dreams are wild and imaginative, and my own writing is inspired … all thanks to the beautiful dark fairytale that is the Book Of Lost Things. Once I have finished this book I think that I may become a bit of a lost thing without it.

The Book Of Lost Things

The Book Of Lost Things

The First Bad Man by Miranda July

This book sounds a bit raucous and that puts it to the top of my list instantly. It has been fast tracked, I will admit it, and I cant wait to start it. Described by the author as containing ‘woman-on-woman violence, unexpected parenthood, first love, explicit sex, David Bowie, foot fungus, ‘adult games’, escaped African snails and the soul of a baby names Kubelko Bondy’ it sounds like 50 Shades of Grey on acid, set to good music and with better characters. Plainly put, it sounds great.

The First Bad Man

The First Bad Man

The Secret Of Magic by Deborah Johnson

Set in the deep south in the 1940’s, this whodunnit story sounds beautiful and intriguing. Described by The Sunday Times as ‘A powerful portrait of the Deep South in the year before the civil rights movement’, it conjures up memories of The Help, and I can safely presume it will be just as addictive.

The Secret Of Magic

The Secret Of Magic

The Lightning Tree by Emily Woolf

I love characters, rather than story, and this novel is centralized around the change that takes place in its main character, and leaves the reader analyzing what it was that produced that change. A delicate, coming of age story with lightening-bolt humour. It has all the ingredients to be a modern-day version of Chopin’s The Awakening. Here’s hoping.

The Lightning Tree

The Lightning Tree

Mindfulness in Eight Weeks by Michael Chaskalson

Mindfulness is a topic that crops up everywhere these days, and is something which if you haven’t latched on to, you are missing out on big time. It is a way of reclaiming your sense of self, your peace of mind, and your relationship with time. Step into the moment and let this book guide you in just 8 weeks. Then you will see what all the fuss is about, I promise.

Mindfulness in Eight Weeks

Mindfulness in Eight Weeks

The Rocks by Peter Nichols

This book has a beautiful front cover and is set on the island of Mallorca. As I used to live there and it has a special place in my heart, I’m already sold. The fact that it sounds like an interesting story, spanning 60 years and the blurb describes it as ‘a darkly comic, bittersweet, finally heartbreaking novel, that slips back in time to reveal the shocking incident that marked and altered these lives for ever.’ just cements its place on my March book list. I’m excited about this one.

The Rocks by Peter Nichols

The Rocks by Peter Nichols

Get In Trouble: Stories by Kelly Link

To complete my reading list, this collection of magical short stories already has a cult following and are dark explorations of utterly everything: ghosts, love, hurricanes, astronauts, evil twins, bootleggers, Ouija boards, iguanas, The Wizard of Oz, superheroes, the pyramids. Let your imagination go wild!

Get in Trouble: Stories

Get in Trouble: Stories